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August 23, 2014

Agents and editors? Do writers really need them? Meet DoubleBridge.

Anyone who's tried to get published---from unknown Norman Mailers and John Updikes struggling to land the right agent to students, lawyers, execs, stay-at-home moms and other moonlighters and part-timers with a completed draft of that war or mystery tome and absolutely no clue about what to do with it--should like this new online publishing service platform: DoubleBridge Publishing, a new platform for publishing using a crowdsourcing model.

Unlike traditional brick and mortar publishing houses, DoubleBridge relies on crowdsourcing for 90% of its publishing house functions and also provides valuable review services, close to cost, to the public. A manuscript is reviewed for a small fee by several qualified reviewers who, in effect, screen the publication for quality and drive its next step.

DC-area businessman Rich O'Brien launched Doublebridge last week. He created the platform to link writers to qualified book reviewers, editors and formatters in order to help improve the quality of manuscripts received work and publish the best.

According to O'Brien, potential reviewers--including industry professionals, award-winning authors and aspiring authors--have already flooded the DoubleBridge website (www.doublebridgepublishing.com) with crowdsourcing membership applications.

"If you have your great American novel sitting in a drawer, pull it out and submit it, and our qualified members will give you three reviews highlighting its strengths or weaknesses", O'Brien said.

He continued: "If it’s good enough? We’ll publish it."

OBrien.jpg
DoubleBridge Founder and CEO O'Brien

Posted by JD Hull at August 23, 2014 12:23 PM

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